www.nylegionpost90@yahoo.com       

Copyright@August, 2016  Updated 09-04-2018

Copyright@August, 2016  Updated 09-04-2018
The American Legion, approved by an act of
congress, is a   social and armed forces. The organization
was founded in 1919 by veterans returning from Europe after
World War I,.. The group has nearly 3 million members in
over 14,000 Posts worldwide.

A Post is the basic unit of the American Legion and
usually represents a small geographic area such as a single
town or part of a county.

A Post is used for formal business such as meetings and  
a coordination point for community service projects.  A Post
member is distinguished by a navy blue garrison cap with
gold piping.

NY Legion Post 50 of Pelham, New York,
Westchester County
was established in  October 1923 ,  
dedicated to a single purpose: empowering veterans to lead
high-quality lives with respect and dignity.We accomplish this
by ensuring that veterans and their   families,  can access the
full range of benefits available

WHAT MAKES OUR POST UNIQUE:
We are a small post, we do not even have a building, and yet
we support a Boy Scout Troop  (1), we have scholarships,
sponsor  Boys State, and promote Americanism . We
participate in several military ceremony. In short, we are a
little post with a big agenda.
The Four Chaplains, also sometimes referred to as the "Immortal Chaplains" or
the , also sometimes referred to as the "Immortal Chaplains" or the "Dorchester
Chaplains" were four United States Army chaplains who gave their lives to save
other civilian and military personnel as the troop ship SS Dorchester sank on
February 3, 1943, during World War II. They helped other soldiers board
lifeboats and gave up their own life jackets when the supply ran out.[1] The
chaplains joined arms, said prayers, and sang hymns as
they
went down with the ship.

The relatively new chaplains all held the rank of first lieutenant. They included
Methodist minister the Reverend George L. Fox, Reform Rabbi Alexander D.
Goode (Ph.D.), Roman Catholic priest the Reverend John P. Washington, and
Reformed Church in America minister the Reverend Clark V. Poling. Their
backgrounds, personalities, and faiths were different, although Goode, Poling
and Washington had all served as leaders in the Boy Scouts of America.[2] They
met at the Army Chaplains School at Harvard University, where they prepared
for assignments in the European theater, sailing on board Dorchester to report
to their new assignments.

George L. Fox was born March 15, 1900, in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, the
eldest of eight children. When he was 17, he left school and lied about his age in
order to join the Army to serve in World War I. He joined the ambulance corps in
1917, assigned to Camp Newton D. Baker in Texas. On December 3, 1917,
George embarked from Camp Merritt, New Jersey, and boarded the USS Huron
en route to France. As a medical corps assistant, he was highly decorated for
bravery and was awarded the Silver Star, Purple Heart and the French Croix de
Guerre.

Upon his discharge, he returned home to Altoona, where he completed high
school. He entered Moody Bible Institute in Illinois in 1923. He and Isadora G.
Hurlbut of Vermont were married in 1923, when he began his religious career as
an itinerant preacher in the Methodist faith. He later graduated from Illinois
Wesleyan University in Bloomington, served as a student pupil in Rye, New
Hampshire, and then studied at the Boston University School of Theology,
where he was ordained a Methodist minister on June 10, 1934. He served
parishes in Thetford, Union Village, and Gilman, Vermont, and was appointed
state chaplain and historian for the American Legion in Vermont.

In 1942, Fox volunteered to serve as an Army chaplain, accepting his
appointment July 24, 1942. He began active duty on August 8, 1942, the same
day his son Wyatt enlisted in the Marine Corps. After Army Chaplains school at
Harvard, he reported to the 411th Coast Artillery Battalion at Camp Davis. He
was then united with Chaplains Goode, Poling and Washington at Camp Myles
Standish in Taunton, Massachusetts, where they prepared to depart for Europe
on board the Dorchester.[3]

Alexander D. Goode
Reform-Rabbi Alexander D. Goode (Ph.D) was born in Brooklyn, New York on
May 10, 1911, the son of Rabbi Hyman Goodekowitz. He was raised in
Washington, D.C., attending Eastern High School, eventually deciding to follow
his father's footsteps by studying for the rabbinate himself, at Hebrew Union
College (HUC), where he graduated with a B.H. degree in 1937. He later
received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 1940. While studying for the
rabbinate at HUC, he worked at the Washington Hebrew Congregation during
summer breaks.[4]

He originally applied to become a Navy chaplain in January 1941, but was not
accepted. After the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, he applied to the Army,
receiving his appointment as a chaplain on July 21, 1942. Chaplain Goode went
on active duty on August 9, 1942, and was selected for the Chaplains School at
Harvard. Chaplain Goode was then assigned to the 333rd Airbase Squadron in
Goldsboro, North Carolina. In October 1942, he was transferred to Camp Myles
Standish in Taunton, Massachusetts and reunited with Chaplains Fox, Poling
and Washington, who were classmates at Harvard.[5]

Clark V. Poling was born August 7, 1910, in Columbus, Ohio, the son of
evangelical minister Daniel A. Poling, who was rebaptized in 1936 as a Baptist
minister. Clark Poling studied at Yale University's Divinity School in New Haven,
Connecticut and graduated with his B.D. degree in 1936. He was ordained in the
Reformed Church in America, and served first in the First Church of Christ, New
London, Connecticut, and then as Pastor of the First Reformed Church, in
Schenectady, New York. He married Betty Jung.

With the outbreak of World War II, Poling decided to enter the Army, wanting to
face the same danger as others. His father, who had served as a World War I
chaplain, told him chaplains risk and give their lives, too—and with that
knowledge, he applied to serve as an Army chaplain, accepting an appointment
on June 10, 1942 as a chaplain with the 131st Quartermaster Truck Regiment,
reporting to Camp Shelby, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, on June 25. Later he
reported to Army Chaplains School at Harvard, where he would meet Chaplains
Fox, Goode, and Washington.[6]

John P. Washington was born in Newark, New Jersey on July 18, 1908. He
studied at Seton Hall, in South Orange, New Jersey, to complete his high school
and college courses in preparation for the Catholic priesthood. He graduated in
1931 with an A.B. Degree, entering Immaculate Conception Seminary in
Darlington, New Jersey, where he received his minor orders on May 26, 1933.
He served as a subdeacon at all the solemn masses and later became a deacon
on December 25, 1934. He was elected prefect of his class and was ordained a
priest on June 15, 1935.

Father Washington's first parish was at St. Genevieve's, in Elizabeth, New
Jersey. He later served at St. Venantius for a year. In 1938, he was assigned to
St. Stephen's in Kearny, New Jersey. Shortly after the Pearl Harbor attack of
December 7, 1941, he received his appointment as a chaplain in the United
States Army, reporting for active duty on May 9, 1942. He was named Chief of
the Chaplains Reserve Pool, in Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, and in June
1942, he was assigned to the 76th Infantry Division in Ft. George Meade,
Maryland. In November 1942, he reported to Camp Myles Standish in Taunton,
Massachusetts and met Chaplains Fox, Goode and Poling at Chaplains School
at Harvard.[7

The Four Chaplains, also sometimes referred to as the "Immortal Chaplains" or
the "Dorchester Chaplains" were four United States Army chaplains who gave
their lives to save other civilian and military personnel as the troop ship SS
Dorchester sank on February 3, 1943, during World War II. They helped other
soldiers board lifeboats and gave up their own life jackets when the supply ran
out.[1] The chaplains joined arms, said prayers, and sang hymns as they went
down with the ship.

The relatively new chaplains all held the rank of first lieutenant. They included
Methodist minister the Reverend George L. Fox, Reform Rabbi Alexander D.
Goode (Ph.D.), Roman Catholic priest the Reverend John P. Washington, and
Reformed Church in America minister the Reverend Clark V. Poling. Their
backgrounds, personalities, and faiths were different, although Goode, Poling
and Washington had all served as leaders in the Boy Scouts of America.[2] They
met at the Army Chaplains School at Harvard University, where they prepared
for assignments in the European theater, sailing on board Dorchester to report
to their new assignments.

The story

Dorchester left New York on January 23, 1943, en route to Greenland, carrying
the four chaplains and approximately 900 others, as part of a convoy of three
ships (SG-19 convoy). Most of the military personnel were not told the ship's
ultimate destination. The convoy was escorted by Coast Guard Cutters Tampa,
Escanaba, and Comanche.[12]

Coast Guard Cutter USCGC Escanaba rescues Dorchester survivors.
The ship's captain, Hans J. Danielsen, had been alerted that Coast Guard sonar
had detected a submarine. Because German U-boats were monitoring sea lanes
and had attacked and sunk ships earlier during the war, Captain Danielsen had
the ship's crew on a state of high alert even before he received that information,
ordering the men to sleep in their clothing and keep their life jackets on. "Many
soldiers sleeping deep in the ship's hold disregarded the order because of the
engine's heat. Others ignored it because the life jackets were uncomfortable."[13]

During the early morning hours of February 3, 1943, at 12:55 a.m., the vessel
was torpedoed by the German submarine U-223 off Newfoundland in the North
Atlantic.[13]

The torpedo knocked out the Dorchester‍ '​s electrical system, leaving the ship
dark. Panic set in among the men on board, many of them trapped below decks.
The chaplains sought to calm the men and organize an orderly evacuation of the
ship, and helped guide wounded men to safety. As life jackets were passed out
to the men, the supply ran out before each man had one. The chaplains
removed their own life jackets and gave them to others. They helped as many
men as they could into lifeboats, and then linked arms and, saying prayers and
singing hymns, went down with the ship.[13]

As I swam away from the ship, I looked back. The flares had lighted everything.
The bow came up high and she slid under. The last thing I saw, the Four
Chaplains were up there praying for the safety of the men. They had done
everything they could. I did not see them again. They themselves did not have a
chance without their life jackets.

—Grady Clark, survivor[14]

According to some reports, survivors could hear different languages mixed in the
prayers of the chaplains, including Jewish prayers in Hebrew and Catholic
prayers in Latin.[15]

Some 230 of the 904 men aboard the ship were rescued. Life jackets offered
little protection from hypothermia, which killed most men in the water. The water
temperature was 34 °F (1 °C) and the air temperature was 36 °F (2 °C). By the
time additional rescue ships arrived, "hundreds of dead bodies were seen
floating on the water, kept up by their life jackets."[16]